DEVELOPMENTAL LANGUAGE DISORDER

DLD stands for Developmental Language Disorder. Having DLD means your child may have difficulties with understanding and/or using all known languages. DLD can be identified in children from the age of 5 who are likely to have difficulties which may affect their academic progress and persist into adulthood. DLD is believed to affect around 2 children in every classroom. DLD is more common in boys than girls.
DLD was previously known as Specific Language Impairment (SLI).

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Causes


There is no known cause of DLD, which can make it hard to explain. DLD is not caused by emotional difficulties or reduced exposure to language. However, a child or young person with DLD may or may not have difficulties in other areas. A child may or may not have medical conditions co-existing with DLD, but these do not cause DLD.


Signs that a child or young person may have DLD:

  • Speech is difficult to understand

  • Difficulty saying words or sentences

  • Lower than average literacy skills e.g. reading, writing and spelling

  • Difficulty understanding how and when to use language appropriately in social situations

  • Difficulty understanding words or instructions that they hear from others

  • Difficulty understanding or remembering what has been said to them

  • Remember: DLD looks different in each individual child.